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Dark Life of Child Labour Behind the Shinning Mica

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child labour

Two children aged 5 and 8 pounding mica shows the worst form of child labour/ Image Source: Christine Romo / NBC News

People around the world are just aware that mica is something that makes their products shiny. It is used in cosmetics, paints and electronics. But few people are aware of its production story involving worst form of child labour.

India and Madagascar are the largest exporter of mica sheets worldwide and are often associated with claims that the worst form of child labour is being used to extract mica in a harmful mining process. Poverty is the major reason forcing children to engage in the mining sector and earn supplemental income for their families. Another reason is the unregulated nature of the mining sector which encourages the illegal use of children in mining.

Also Read: Children in Conflict Suffering Grave Violations

In Bihar and Jharkhand, two major mica-producing states of India estimated children engagement is 22,000 which is not accurate as numbers are not reported by the mines. 

While in Madagascar, the estimated number of children in mica mining is 10,000 as per the US Department of Labor. Even a research study reveals that children make up almost half of the total labour of the mica industry in Madagascar. 

Vulnerable and innocent children paid only around seventy cents for their whole day’s labour. This shows how unsympathetic and inhumane the system is.

Children are Forced to Jump into Life-Threatening Activities 

The process of mica extraction is very dangerous as children have to undergo narrow and suffocating shafts. Once children go inside they find themselves alone and in complete darkness. These shafts are fragile and can collapse which endangers the life of small children.

An NGO Children in Need Institute (CINI) reported that between 2013 and 2018, 45 children had died in mica mines.

Children in Mica mines

Image Source: JACK PEARCE.

Besides, they constantly work in clouds of dust and inhalation leads to pneumonia and respiratory diseases that shorten their life quality and time.

Even these unregulated and unsystematic mines often do not possess tools and children are forced to use their bare hands for various mining activities that result in cuts, bruises and infections to their hands and other body parts.

Also Read: Children of Palestine: A childhood lost to trauma without an end

These children are the face of modern slavery, extortion and abuse. Young girls are even sexually exploited in nearby areas of mines as mentioned in a report by the US Department of Labour.

Family that lost a kid to mica mining

The family lost one of their teenage daughter in a mine collapse

Image Source: JACK PEARCE

These children do not get an education and hence for their whole life they are trapped in a never-ending cycle of abuse, pain and struggle for pennies. Chances of higher formal education and hence better living opportunities remain a dream for them and their families.

Why are Children Engaged in Mining?

  1. High levels of unemployment and lack of income-generating activities in the vicinity of mining areas forced the parents to send their children to work in mica mining. It is their source of income for them. They have to eat and they have to survive.
  1. Lack of governance and lose regulations assist the employment of children in the mining sector with such impunity.
  1. Almost 70% of mica comes from illegal mining hence the mining industry is largely unregulated and unorganised and informal mining often leads to employment and exploitation of small children.
  1. Small stature and delicate hands often become valuable for entering narrow shafts and picking up the small pieces of mica. Small children are accompanied by their families. 

This is the classic case where we see how developing countries are facing the resource curse for the demand for such resources by resource-ridden but rich countries.

How to End This Worst Form of Child Abuse.

Even if the mining of mica is banned, it would only add to the atrocities of families and children involved in mica mining. They would not be able to fetch even a handful of food as there is almost no source of income present for them. It is a moral dilemma for all those who are involved in the supply chain of mica from local to a global level.

Also Read: Children in Syria with no Future

The only solution is education for children and alternate livelihood provisions for the families. Authorities can make efforts to educate the families on the long-term hazards and life threats of mica mining. 

Professional training and other skills can be given to the people of nearby areas who are dependent on mica mining. So that they can earn at least a basic income with safety. 

Government can take help from the NGOs who can help establish skill-based small businesses or workshops for the people, especially among the women and girls. So that they can learn skills and trade manufactured goods to cities.

NGOs can help make connections between them and suppliers of their goods.

Likewise, local authorities can make provision for children’s education in nearby areas so that they don’t have to travel to far away locations. This would hugely impact girls as they could gain education due to safety and would not have to undergo an early marriage burden.

Also Read: Afghanistan: Girl’s Education Under the Taliban Regime Hanging by a Thread

In India, there is a system of Anganwadi (it is a kind of rural child care centre in India.

It consists of a group of women volunteers appointed by the administration to look after the needs of women and children especially food and nutrition needs in rural areas) and compulsory food provision for school children. Authorities can make sure to provide nutritious and consistent food supply to school children so that families do not have to go back to mining for just a handful of food.

So we can say that instead of abolishing mica mining, it is more important to regulate and clean the mica supply chain. Helping families living near mining areas must be given opportunities for better and just livelihood options.

Every consumer has the responsibility to know from where their product’s source mica. They can call, tweet, write and inquire from the beauty brands if they are sourcing the child labour-free mica for their beauty products. Even these simple steps from the consumers can create a buzz among the beauty products suppliers and get them responsible and accountable for a clean mica supply chain and to contribute to the betterment of the community engaged in mica mining.

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Pakistan’s Climate Crisis: A Peek Into The Apocalyptic Future That Awaits

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Extreme flooding in Pakistan shows the severity of climate change crisis.

One-third of Pakistan Submerged By “Monsoon On Steroids”

The world has faced much climate crisis devastation over the decades. However, in August 2022, the climate carnage in Pakistan brought this crisis into a whole new ball game. The image above is from the New Humanitarian, showing people attempting to flee the floods. The climate-induced flooding has affected over 50 million people. This disaster has left one-third of Pakistan underwater, with some parts resembling “a small ocean”.

The Pakistan flooding indicates the consequences of the universal and rapacious climate crisis unravelling at unprecedented speed. However, it seems that most of the world hasn’t considered Pakistan’s epic humanitarian crisis for what it represents.

Pakistan has a famine looming, $30 billion in economic loss, 50 million people internally displaced, and a high threat of a malaria epidemic present as floodwater lies stagnant. Furthermore, an entire generation in Pakistan is deprived access to essential services in health and education. Deaths will rise with colder winter months approaching and millions left without homes.

Climate Crisis in Pakistan is Beyond Bleak

For decades, Pakistan has seen record-breaking temperatures, torrential rains, glacial melt, droughts, and floods. This current weather disaster is the most extreme torrential rainfall and devastating flash floods Pakistan has seen in 73 years. Millions have fled their homes with little more than rags to protect them from scorching high temperatures of 40 degrees Celsius. Pakistan is one of the world’s top ten most vulnerable countries on the Climate Risk Index but only contributes to less than 1% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

Pakistan’s National Disaster Management Authority updated the death toll from the crisis since mid-June to 1,545 people and 552 children. This disaster spurred the United Nations to issue its largest-ever disaster appeal, at over $2 billion.

The Plight of Pakistani Children During A Climate Crisis

The flooding has adversely affected millions of children since the crisis started. Due to the extreme flooding, children in Pakistan are battling diarrhoea, malaria, dengue fever, and painful skin conditions. According to UNICEF, 3.4 million children urgently need immediate life-saving support and humanitarian assistance.

Image obtained from the Guardian © Shah Meer Baloch. This is Zeeshan Chandio with his son Nadeem Chandio, whose stomach has swollen from malnutrition during Pakistan's climate crisis.
Caption: Image obtained from the Guardian © Shah Meer Baloch. This is Zeeshan Chandio with his son Nadeem Chandio, whose stomach has swollen from malnutrition during Pakistan’s climate crisis.

Approximately 16 million children are without homes, lack access to safe drinking water, and live in unsanitary conditions. Millions of children are at increased risk of water-borne diseases, drowning, and malnutrition. In addition, the flooding exacerbates the threat of snakes, scorpions and mosquitoes, all of which carry life-threatening diseases.

The International Communities Response to The Climate Crisis

There has been silence from prominent international figures and western media outlets concerning Pakistan. In the first week of the floods, more newspaper articles covered the Finnish prime minister’s social life than the unfolding weather event. This questions the global outlook and prioritization concerning climate change.

The flooding has sparked an ongoing debate regarding broader issues of responsibility for loss and damage endured by nations affected by climate change. Global warming is primarily caused by the Global North’s disregard for the environment and excessive release of greenhouse gas emissions. However, despite the Global North’s overwhelming contribution to the crisis, there is still a complete disregard for the pain suffered by Pakistanis in its international response.

Read also: Pakistan Flood Puts Climate Injustice In The Spotlight: The Age Of Catastrophe.

Double Standards and Racism in response to Various Humanitarian Crisis

The international response to Pakistan is minuscule compared to Ukraine, where around 12 million people were displaced. Comparatively, this figure represents a third of the displaced people in Pakistan, reaching over 50 million. World leaders criticize the international community’s focus on the war in Ukraine. The same attention is not given to crises in other parts of the world. The mass media apply double standards to reporting depending on the race and nationality of those affected by the humanitarian crisis.

Read Also: Israel’s Apartheid Against Palestinians Reveals West’s Double Standards.

The international communities’ weak response is either a form of racism and ideology that terrible things happen in places like Pakistan or an utter failure of compassion.

Caption: Image obtained from the BBC (GETTY Images). Shows young children on a makeshift boat who are trying to escape the flooding in Pakistan.

Climate Change Discriminates Against Women and Girls

Women and children are facing a dangerous downwards spiral of hunger and malnutrition. In Pakistan, there are 650,000 pregnant women and girls. Moreover, 73,000 mothers are expected to deliver in the coming weeks. The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) says many women lack access to health-care facilities and support to deliver their children safely.

Climate change continues to exacerbate maternal and newborn health inequities. Aid groups report that many mothers are anaemic and malnourished and deliver very low-weight babies. In addition, mothers are too ill to breastfeed their children.

Pakistan has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in South Asia. The majority of Pakistani women give birth at home. However, with millions of homes destroyed, many women do not know where they will deliver their babies in the coming months or years.

The Pakistani crisis highlights how climate change disproportionately impacts women and girls. In Sindh province, more than 1,000 health facilities have been fully or partially destroyed. In Balochistan province, flooding damaged 198 health facilities.

“I am deeply concerned about the potential for a second disaster in Pakistan: a wave of disease and death following this catastrophe, linked to climate change, that has severely impacted vital health systems leaving millions vulnerable”

World Health Organization (WHO) chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

Political Instability in Pakistan

In August 2022, Pakistan had a 27% inflation rate. The Pakistani rupee crashed, and net foreign reserves fell to $8 billion. Pakistan continues to face political instability due to a showdown involving the government, the military, and ex-prime minister Imran Khan. This makes it difficult to carry out an effective flood response and begin rebuilding people’s lives.

Furthermore, political instability has resulted in food insecurity and electricity and fuel shortages.

https://twitter.com/KhaledBeydoun/status/1572248314124402690
Caption: Campaign raising money for Pakistanis affected by the flooding as death toll surpasses 1500. Video footage was obtained from Sky News.

Government Inaction and Lack of Disaster Preparedness

The government should have done more in the past few decades to flood-proof communities within Pakistan and prepare.

Climate scientists warned that this situation would arrive. Moreover, it will take years to rebuild infrastructure and homes in Pakistan. The damage is worse than the 2010 flooding, which killed 1700 people. The death toll is expected to be higher, indicating that the Pakistani government did not learn anything from the 2010 flooding.

While climate change is the critical driver behind Pakistan’s extreme weather, policy experts held that the flooding was exacerbated by government inaction and mismanagement, structural inequalities in marginalized areas, and poor policy-based decisions.

Thousands of villages saw broken drainage systems and swamped roads. Although raising climate awareness is essential, we must shift the discourse to climate preparedness. Pakistani officials place much blame on climate change but use this as a scapegoat for their incompetence. Developed countries should be helping poorer nations to prepare for climate change disasters. This is the responsibility of more prosperous nations in the Global North, who are responsible for the level of greenhouse gas emissions currently in the atmosphere.

Concluding Thoughts

This humanitarian crisis has shown us that we must develop an impactful, inclusive, and holistic climate preparation plan to address future flooding. International assistance is essential to help Pakistan’s fragile political and economic environment.

This climate crisis should also serve as a wake-up call for world leaders in the Global North to reduce emissions drastically.

UN secretary-general António Guterres held that the world should stop “sleepwalking” through this climate crisis. We must start thinking more seriously about how to prevent such disasters in the future.

Today it is Pakistan, but tomorrow it could be your country.

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Israel’s Apartheid Against Palestinians Reveals West’s Double Standards

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Israel’s Apartheid Against Palestinians Reveals West’s “Double Standards”

Ceasefire Following Three-day Israeli Bombardment in Gaza

A ceasefire on Sunday, 7th August 2022, ended another unjustified three-day Israeli bombardment in the besieged apartheid Gaza strip. Devastating figures reveal the civilian cost of the escalation and the impact of crimes against humanity in the occupied Palestinian territory.

The Israel Defence Forces (IDF) announced operation “Breaking Dawn” on Friday, 5th August 2022. Israel fired shots at targets it claimed were linked to the Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ), killing a senior commander in the PIJ. The operation caused inconceivable damage to local civilians and infrastructure with a complete disregard for human life.

The UN Human Rights Office held that 49 Palestinians were killed, including 17 children, with more than 360 people injured. Nearly two-thirds of those injured were civilians, including 151 children, 58 women and 19 older people. Furthermore, 19 Palestinian children have been killed in the occupied Palestinian territory in the past week. There were no serious injuries to report from Israel.

Most Severe Flare-up Since May 2021

Last week’s hostilities were the most severe flare-up on the Gaza strip since May 2021, when Israel attacked Gaza killing 256 Palestinians, including 66 children. In Israel, 13 people were killed, including two children. Israel has imposed tight restrictions on the movement of people and goods in and out of Gaza since 2007. The 15-year blockade has left the occupied territory of Palestine teetering on the edge of a humanitarian disaster. Following the ceasefire, the aftershock of trauma sets in for Palestinians, leaving millions of lives shattered.

15-year Land, Air and Sea Blockade in Gaza

The Gaza Strip, home to 2.1 million people, has been under an Israeli-imposed land, sea and air blockade for the past 15 years. The map below shows where the Gaza strip lies in relation to Israel and the main refugee camps.

Caption: Map of the Gaza Strip where Israel’s apartheid against the Palestinians originates. Image obtained from Wiki Media Commons.

Israel continues to launch airstrikes into densely packed cities and neighbourhoods filled predominantly with civilians. Shockingly, since 2008, Israel has initiated four conflicts in Gaza, killing approximately 4000 people, including 600 children.

Israel’s Systematic Apartheid Against the Palestinians

Israel’s apartheid of the Palestinian people is a cruel system of domination and crimes against humanity. Moreover, Israel commits unlawful killings, forcible transfers and drastic movement restrictions on Palestinians. Additionally, due to the blockade, Gaza lacks access to food, water, essential medicines, and commodities. Palestinians must smuggle food and medicines through illegal tunnels, which the IDF regularly bomb. Israel continues to carry out massive seizures of Palestinian land and property, defying international law.

Caption: The image shows the Palestinian loss of land from 1947 to 2020. Image obtained from Wiki Media Commons.

Furthermore, Israel denies nationality and citizenship to Palestinians. These listed elements of the brutal Israeli system amount to apartheid under international law. 

Amnesty International published a report titled “Israel’s apartheid Against Palestinians” in February 2022. The report calls out Israel’s systematic oppression of Palestinians as ‘apartheid’. The report concludes that Israeli laws and policies of segregation, exclusion, and dispossession constitute “the crime against humanity of apartheid” as defined in the Rome Statute and the Apartheid convention.

In addition to this, there have been calls on the International Criminal Court (ICC) to investigate apartheid in Palestine.

Caption: A Palestinian lies in his home, which has been struck by an Israeli airstrike. Image obtained from Reuters.

The West and the United Nations Impose “Double Standards” of Crimes Against Humanity

The west reveals “double standards” of crimes against humanity compared to the reaction to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. In the context of Ukraine, world leaders used solid and robust language to describe Putin’s crimes against humanity. However, Israel’s oppression of the Palestinian people is not met with the same strength of language.

In the video below, Richard Boyd Barrett captures the utter hypocrisy of the west’s “double standards” when it comes to imposing sanctions on Israel the same way they have sanctioned Russia.

Caption: Irish Politician, Richard Boyd Barrett, speaks out about Israel’s apartheid against Palestinians and the government’s double standards on crimes against humanity.

Moreover, Israel’s position of an apartheid system weakens any prospect of establishing an independent Palestinian State. Moreover, despite the UN’s willingness to act decisively on other issues, the Council’s inability to act against Israel illustrates the persistent double standards through its selectivity on which principles apply to certain states.

Putin is Holding Up a Mirror to Israelis

Gideon Levy, an Israeli journalist and author, compared Israel and Russia as essentially interchangeable. Levy writes how Israel has behaved precisely like Russia more than just once. Israel and Russia use the same demonization strategy. The Ukrainians are depicted as Nazis, and the Palestinians are labelled as terrorists who wish to destroy Israel. With the assistance of Egypt, Israel has essentially turned the Gaza strip into an open-air prison.

International Finacial Aid Focused on Ukraine

The world will soon be on the edge of a global recession due to the financial constraints arising from the COVID-19 pandemic and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Skyrocketing inflation rates in the United States and other major European economies make obtaining international financial support for Palestinians very difficult at these times.

How Much Blood Must Be Shed Before We Take Collective Action?

Israel treats Palestinians living in Gaza, East Jerusalem and the rest of the West Bank, or Israel itself, as an inferior racial group and systematically deprives them of their fundamental human rights. 

There is a persistent lack of accountability for Israel’s actions in the occupied Palestinian territory. Israel commits recurring violations of international human rights law and the law of occupation of the West Bank while persistently using unnecessary and disproportionate use of force.

We must hold Israel accountable by urging the ICC to consider the crime of apartheid in its current investigation of Palestine. Furthermore, the UN Security Council has the ability to impose an arms embargo on Israel to cover all weapons and munitions. The UN Council can impose targeted sanctions such as freezing the assets of Israeli officials heavily involved in perpetrating the apartheid.

The war and persecution of the Palestinian people will continue while the climate of impunity prevails.

The real question now is whether the world will apply economic sanctions to Israel just as it did to end apartheid in South Africa and restrict Russia’s power in its invasion of Ukraine. Or will we continue to impose double standards on crimes against humanity?

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Africa

Female Genital Mutilation in Somalia Reflects Deep-Rooted Gender Inequality

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Female Genital Mutilation in Somalia Reflects Deep-Rooted Gender Inequality Within Society

Background: Female Genital Mutilation in Somalia

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in Somalia reflects a deep-rooted gender inequality. Somalia has a 99% prevalence rate among women aged 15-49 years. Most girls are subject to FGM between five and nine years old. Thus, Somalia has the highest rate of FGM in the world. These were the latest statistics from the Somali Health and Demographic Survey 2022.

There is an international consensus that FGM is a violation of human rights. The prevalence of FGM in Somalia represents one of the most extreme forms of discrimination against girls and women. Consequently, this traditional practice has a catastrophic impact on women’s health. FGM results in high health care costs for countries where it is practised. Additionally, women and girls subjected to this practice are vulnerable to mental health problems, reduced opportunities for growth, early marriages and early school dropouts.

What is Female Genital Mutilation?

FGM involves the partial or total removal of external female genitalia or another injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons.

Additionally, FGM can be divided into four subcategories. The most severe form is the total removal of the clitoris, the labia minora and the intersection of the labia majora. Additionally, the sides of the labia majora are typically sewn together, leaving only a small hole for urine and menstrual blood to pass through.

Moreover, Somalia is not the only country carrying out this harmful cultural tradition. Hence, the map below illustrates where FGM occurs worldwide based on four different severity categories. These categories are based on FGM media reporting, research and surveys conducted in different countries.

Map illustrates the prevalence of Female Genital Mutilation worldwide as a result of deep-rooted gender inequality.
Caption: The map illustrates the prevalence of Female Genital Mutilation worldwide due to deep-rooted gender inequality. Source from FAWCO.

FGM Has No Health Benefits & Poses Many Serious Risks

FGM poses many short and long-term harmful complications for those subjected to the practice. Moreover, FGM does not have any health benefits for girls or women. Some short-term complications include bleeding, pain, fever, infection and urinary problems. However, some of the long term-complications include:

  • chronic pain,
  • urinary problems,
  • extreme bleeding,
  • menstrual problems,
  • sexual problems,
  • infections,
  • increased risk of complications in childbirth,
  • permanent disability,
  • psychological problems,
  • and possible death.
Some use a razor blade in order to perform the Female Genital Mutilation procedure.
Caption: Some use a razor blade to perform the Female Genital Mutilation procedure. Image obtained from NPR.

Eradicating This Harmful Cultural Tradition Through Self-Empowerment

The International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation is marked every year on the 6th of February. The UN sexual and reproductive health agency (UNFPA) continues to lead the UN in eradicating FGM worldwide.

The Ministry for Women and Human Rights Development, the UNFPA and Ifrah Foundation’s “Dear Daughter Campaignhave taken a radically different approach to end FGM in Somalia. Thus, this campaign aims to change the FGM narrative in Somalia through education and dialogue. Furthermore, Dear Daughter targets rural and urban individuals and communities. Therefore, the principle of self-empowerment is central to their unique approach.

The campaign aims to encourage mothers to pledge not to cut their daughters. Accordingly, through letter-writing, Somali mothers pledge to protect and support their right to govern their bodies. When other families witness these pledges, it inspires them to follow in the same footsteps.

“Dear Daughter” engages in advocacy, media and grassroots campaigning nationally in Somalia. The campaign empowers women to promise their daughters a future free from FGM in Somalia.

Caption: Dear Daughter Campaign aims to eradicate Female Genital Mutilation in Somalia and improve gender inequality.

Real-life Insights Into the Life of Halima

Halima, aged 50, is a mother of five daughters and five sons, living in an internally displaced camp on the outskirts of Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia. Hamlia works as a camp gatekeeper and is an influential community member. Therefore, she is an ideal person of interest for the Dear Daughter campaign to help advocate against FGM’s dangers. Furthermore, Halima has not disclosed her real name while being interviewed for safety reasons.

FGM put her life and millions of other women in Somalia’s lives at severe risk. When Halima reached adolescence, passing menstrual blood was difficult, and as a newlywed, sex with her husband was a painful experience. When Halima became pregnant, childbirth was excruciatingly painful, with her labour lasting for several days.

“The procedure was painful, with no anesthesia. I bled for days. I was in bed for more than three months and urinating was a problem”

Hamila (victim of FGM).

Halima subjected her first daughter to be cut despite her suffering, just like her mother had done.

FGM Reflects A Deeply Rooted Gender Inequality

Female Genital Mutilation represents a need for men to have sexual control over girls and women. FGM occurs across different religions, ethnicities, races and social classes. 

Evidently, FGM represents a manifestation of deeply entrenched gender inequality within society. Consequently, girls and women who decide not to follow the social norm are likely to face condemnation from friends, family and potential husbands. Men often ridicule and reject girls and women who have not undergone the procedure.

Many girls and women continue to be subject to FGM despite its harmful impacts. Consequently, many perceive the social benefits of FGM outweigh the disadvantages. It is difficult for families to abandon the practice without support from the wider community.

Changing the Future of FGM for Women in Somalia and Worldwide

According to the WHO, an estimated 200 million girls and women living today have been subjected to FGM across 30 countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Furthermore, UNICEF stated that an additional 68 million are at risk of being subjected to FGM by 2030.

Somalia has widespread conflict, political instability and resource scarcity. In addition to this, Somalia has a fragile government and is currently suffering from one of the most severe droughts the country has witnessed in 40 years.

Ultimately, despite the obstacles, we must take action to help women and eradicate FGM in Somalia and worldwide. This requires a holistic and multi-sectoral collaboration in addressing structural drivers of FGM and the social norms surrounding its practice.

FGM is a violation of girl’s and women’s fundamental human rights.

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